Uncle Mike’s Vegetables

How to use this page: 

     To access “Individual Crop Information”, click on the button below.

     To access “General Gardening Tips” scroll down.

     When hovering over any text, if text color changes, this is a link to another portion of the page.

Individual Crops:

Click Button on the right to select specific Crop

General Gardening Tips

Planting your own vegetable garden can be a very rewarding experience. Homegrown vegetables give a peace of mind because you know how they have been grown. They also give a great sense of satisfaction when produce comes to fruition and looks and tastes wonderful on your dining table. Uncle Mike’s Vegetables are produced on Long Island with the local climate in mind for garden success. Although each type of vegetable we grow has unique growing conditions, many also benefit from similar conditions.

General Tips for all vegetables:

Vegetable gardens should be placed in a sunny portion of your yard. Water should be readily available. Soil should be prepared by loosening the dirt. This will prevent root damage of transplants. Weed mat is an important part of your garden. If set down prior to planting, this will reduce weeds which can choke out the roots of your vegetable plants. It also helps with daily maintenance of your garden. Mulch is also vital in holding water at a consistent level and protecting puddles from forming which could rot the stem or promote spread of disease. It also helps to regulate the soil temperature.

When watering your garden, remember that rain will suffice when plants are young, but as they grow, rain may simply run off the leaves and prevent water from reaching the roots of the plant. It is best to use a soaker hose or water at the base of the plant. Always check soil conditions before watering because too much water, can be just as damaging to a plant as not enough water.

All vegetables benefit from being “fed”. When purchasing your vegetable transplants, ask the nursery associate to recommend the best food for your garden. Feed plants about once a week.

Each year crops should be rotated in your garden. Tomatoes, Peppers, Eggplants, Squash and Strawberries are very sensitive to disease and should not be planted in the same space. Root crops, beans, onions, lettuce, and peas can be grown in these locations to help rejuvenate the soil. Also, adding loam, compost, or lime will help when preparing your garden for a new growing season.

Cool weather crops, or “cole” crops prefer cooler temperatures and although they like full sun, many of them can handle conditions where days are shorter and therefore they receive less sun exposure and cooler soil or air temperatures. Cool weather crops include: Beets, Broccoli, Broccoli Raab, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Celery Knob, Chinese Vegetables, Collard Greens, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Radishes, Spinach, and Swiss Chard. These are the first crops to plant in your garden.

Warm weather crops require not only warmer air temperatures but warmer soil temperatures as well. Many of these crops are more sensitive to temperature variations and should not be planted until there is no threat of frost. Warm weather crops include: Beans, Corn, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Squash and Tomatoes.

 

General Gardening Tips by Crop Type

Beans

Beans are not tolerant to cold. They should only be planted if there is no threat of frost. Young plants are also sensitive to high winds and should be protected until established. They grow best in full sun in soil that supplies sufficient drainage. Although bean plants require plenty of water, it is important that water doesn’t sit by the base of the plant as this will increase rot or disease.

Transplants should be placed at least 4″ apart with about 2′ of space between rows to allow branching. When beans begin to form, they should be checked every day because they ripen quickly and in abundance.

Bush Beans are bush style beans that grow approximately 1-3 feet tall. They normally do not need staking. Traditional bush style beans are Bush (Green) Beans. Edamame (Soy Beans), Lima Beans, Romano Beans and Yellow Beans are also bush style beans. These beans are easy to grow and have high yield in a short period of time.

Pole Beans grow tall and require trellis or staking to support their height. These plants may grow 10 feet tall or higher and can be pinched when reaching the height of your trellis. Pole (Green) Beans produce traditional green beans over a longer period of time. They may continue to yield for up to 2 months.

Beans are produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium Pots.

Bean Varieties in Alphabetic order with container size and growth type:

Bush Beans (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Bush type

 Edamame (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Bush type

Lima (Flats only) Bush type

Pole Beans (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Pole type

Romano (Flats only) Bush type

Yellow (Flats only) Bush type

Beets

Beets are a root crop full of nutrients and relatively easy to grow. They do well in warm temperatures but are also quite tolerant of cooler temperatures. They produce well when planted early in the season. Beets thrive in full sun and need a constant moisture level to grow into a uniform shape. Mulch can be beneficial to protect the plant in the heat of the summer and also to keep the water at a consistent level. Plants should be spaced approximately 4 inches apart to allow the root to expand as it grows. Harvest beets when you see the root beginning to emerge from the soil line.

Beets are produced in flats only

Broccoli

Broccoli is in the family of  “cole” crops which are cool weather crops. These plants are one of the first plants to be planted in your spring garden. Broccoli grows well in a full sun area and can be planted approximately 18 inches apart giving them plenty of room to branch out. Broccoli will grow well when planted in the ground but can also planted in a container. Broccoli requires consistent watering and mulch around the plant base can be used to help with this. Florets will produce in the center of the branches and can be harvested when bright green but prior to floret buds becoming yellow. Cut broccoli low in the branch and the plant will continue to produce new branches with new florets. Broccoli will continue to produce for most of the season.

Broccoli is produced in Flats and 4/5″ Premium Pots

Broccoli Raab

Broccoli Raab gets its name because it looks like mini broccoli florets although it is very different. These plants can be planted early in the spring season and are tolerant to cold weather. Plants can be planted approximately 6 inches apart because they do not branch out as much as Broccoli. Broccoli Raab should be harvested as soon as the mini florets form. If left on the plant too long, they may bolt. When harvesting, you should include leaves, stems and flower buds. Stagger plant times to continue harvest.

Broccoli Raab is produced in Flats only

Brussel Sprouts

Brussel Sprouts are in the family of “cole” crops which are cool weather crops and can be one of the first crops to plant in your spring garden. Plants should be spaced approximately 18 inches apart. These plants taste best when grown in cooler temperatures and can be more bitter if they mature in extreme heat. These small sprout heads look like miniature bite size cabbage heads. Brussel Sprouts need sufficient water and will benefit by being mulched to help keep moisture at a consistent level. Sprouts should be approximately 1 inch at time of harvest. Larger sprouts will form at the lower leaves and should be harvested first. New sprouts will continue to form higher on the stem.

Brussel Sprouts are produced in Flats only

Cabbage

Cabbage are in the family of “cole” crops which are cool weather crops and can be one of the first crops to plant in your spring garden. Plants should be spaced approximately 24 inches apart to form a nice round head. Cabbage need sufficient water and will benefit by being mulched to help keep moisture at a consistent level. They grow well in conditions that have at about 6- 8 hours of sunlight but not in extreme heat. The sunlight is important to help the cabbage leaves to form in a dense manner. Exposure to high heat can damage the head formation and cause the plant to bolt. Cabbage can also be grown in a container. 

Cabbage is produced in Flats only

Cabbage Green

Cabbage Red

Carrots

Carrots are a delicious root crop that we offer in 3 different varieties. Traditional Carrots grow to be approximately 6 to 8 inches long. Baby Carrots grow to be about 3 to 5 inches long. Rainbow Carrots grow similar to traditional carrots only the roots are a variety of colors. Because carrots are a root crop, they grow well in loose, rich soil giving them room to grow down. Carrots may be planted early in the spring season because they are tolerant of cooler temperatures. They produce well in full sun. Water should remain constant and mulch can be used to help keep moisture at a consistent level. Carrots should be harvested when the top of the root begins to dome over the soil level.

Carrots are produced in Flats only

Carrots

Baby Carrots

Rainbow Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is in the family of “cole’ crops which are cool weather crops. These plants are one of the first plants to be planted in your spring garden. Cauliflower likes full sun however, it is very sensitive to temperature variations.  If in direct sun for too long the head can get sun damage called “blanching” which can change it’s color. To avoid this, you can take the surrounding leaves and pull them over the head of cauliflower. They can be held in place with a rubber band, string, or clip. Consistent water is also essential for the head to form correctly and mulch can help with this. When ready for harvest, the head can be cut close to soil level. Only one head will be produced from each plant so you may want to stagger planting time of several plants.

Cauliflower is produced in Flats only

Celery

Celery is a slow growing crop that grows well in moist rich soil.  It can be harvested by cutting off outer branches 1 inch from the base of the plant to prolong harvest and allow new stalks to grow, or by cutting down at the base of the stalk to harvest the full head of celery. 

Celery Knob also known as Celeriac is a root crop that grows best when nights are cool but without danger of frost. As a root crop, celeriac stores well in cool conditions. Although it is very different than celery, it gets its name because the taste is similar to celery. Celeriac grows best in moist rich soil.

Celery is produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium Pots

Celery Knob is produced in Flats only

Celery

Celery Knob (Celeriac)

Chinese Vegetables

Chinese Cabbage grows well in warm temperatures but also stores well after harvest in cool temperatures. It should not be exposed to frost or extended cool nights. Plants should be spaced 12″ apart.  It forms as a dense, tight head and harvested when head is approximately 9″ tall.

Pac Choi is a loose formed leafy head that grows well in warm or cool temperatures but is not tolerant to frost. Outer stalks can be harvested as the head continues to form to prolong harvest period. Plants should be spaced 4″ to 6″ apart.

Chinese Vegetables are produced in Flats only

Chinese Cabbage

Chinese Pac Choi

Collards

Collards are in the family of “cole’ crops which are cool weather crops. Collards prefer cooler temperatures but will produce well in warm temperatures. They are not tolerant of extended frost conditions. Plants should be spaced 18″ to 24″ apart leaving plenty of room for outer leaves to expand. They will produce best in well draining, fertile soil. It is best to harvest individual leaves as they form. This prolongs continued growth of the plant.

Collards are produced in Flats only

Corn

Corn performs best when planted later in the spring when soil temperature is at least 60 degrees. These plants benefit from well drained soil and need plenty of consistent water and food, but not flood conditions. Plants should be spaced 8″ – 12″ apart.  Young plants will not be tolerant of cold weather or high winds. Corn plants produce best when planted in rows rather than in one long line. This helps with natural cross pollination and improves formation of ears of corn on each plant. Each corn plant will produce only several ears of corn so it is best to stagger planting by adding new plants every 2 weeks.

Corn is produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium pots

Cucumbers

Cucumbers thrive in very sunny locations with rich, fertile soil that offers good drainage. Taper the base of the plant with the soil and add mulch to give opportunity for water to drain and not sit at the root. Plants should be spaced 18″ – 30″ apart to allow for the development of vines. Cucumber plants are not tolerant of cool temperatures or heavy winds. Young plants should be protected from these conditions. 

Bush style Cucumbers form a bushy plant and work well in container gardens. Traditional style Cucumbers can benefit from being staked or trellised to direct the vines as they grow. Cucumbers can be quite prolific producers and should be checked on a daily basis to harvest at the optimal time.

Traditional Cucumbers form fruit that is between 7″ and 9″ when ripe. Pickle Cucumbers (Kirby) are smaller. They can be eaten raw or pickled. Armenian Cucumbers are an heirloom variety and grow fruit that can be over 12″ long.

Cucumbers are produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium Pots.

Cucumber Varieties in Alphabetic order with container size, characteristics and fruit size:

Armenian (4.5″ Pots only) Specialty Heirloom Style  12″-18″

Burpless (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)  Long, Thin, Few seeds  7″ – 9″

Bush Crop (Flats only) Good in Containers, Traditional size 6″-8″

Bush Pickle (Flats only) Good in Containers, Smaller fruit  4″-5″

Pickle [Kirby] (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)  Most popular small size   4″ – 6″

Salad Bush (4.5″ Pots only) Good in Containers, Traditional Size 6″ – 8″

Slicer (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Most popular traditional size  8-9″

Eggplant

Eggplant is a very versatile and popular warm weather crop. It grows in a variety of sizes, shapes and colors. Space approximately 2′ apart to give plant plenty of room to grow. Eggplant grow best in a loose, fertile soil that has reached a temperature of at least 60 degrees. These plants will benefit from mulch as it is helpful in providing consistent water levels and keeping water from sitting against the plant. Young plants are not tolerant of cool temperatures or heavy winds. Be sure to prevent exposure to these conditions to protect them. In order to prevent the fruit from tasting bitter, harvest when mature and cook or freeze soon after. 

Eggplants are produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium Pots.  Classic Eggplant is also produced in 7.5″ Premium Pots

Eggplant Varieties in Alphabetic order with container size, characteristics and fruit size:

Classic Black (Flats, 4.5″ Pots, 7.5″ Pots) Traditional size and shape  8″- 10″

Ichiban Japanese Style (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Long  Slim, Less seeds  9″ – 11″

White (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) Mild, White skin    8″ – 10″

Little Fingers (Flats only) Slim, Cluster Fruits 6″ – 8″

Patio Baby (4.5″ Pots only) Good in containers, Cluster Fruits, Small 2″ – 3″

Rosa Bianca (4.5″ Pots only) Italian Heirloom, Light Pink and White   5″-8″

Herbs

Herbs are popular additions to many home gardens as they add unique tastes to many meals and are easy to grow. Each Herb is very different in texture and flavor. Many of them are popular in small containers to provide continuous harvest throughout the summer. They are also popular because they can be stored and used throughout the year. Herbs often drop seeds which will reproduce the following year.

Herbs grow well in very sunny conditions and are best harvested all summer long by snipping off outer leaves or branches and not damaging the center of the plant so that it will continue growing more leaves and branches.

Herbs are produced in Flats, 4.5″ Premium pots, and Garden Packs.  Basil is also produced in 7.5″ Premium pots.

Herbs in Alphabetical order and container size:

Arugula

Flats only

Basil

Flats, 4.5″ pots, Garden packs, 7.5″ Pots

Chives

Flats only

Cilantro

Flats and 4.5″ pots

Dill

Flats only

Oregano

Flats, 4.5″ pots, Garden packs

Parsley Curly

Flats and 4.5″ pots

Parsley Plain Italian

Flats, 4.5″ pots, Garden packs

Peppermint

Flats only

Spearmint

Flats only

Sage

Flats, Garden packs

Thyme

Flats, 4.5″ pots, Garden packs

Kale

Kale is in the family of “cole’ crops which are cool weather crops. They prefer cooler temperatures but will also perform well in warm weather. These nutritious plants will continue to grow throughout the summer. They are easy to harvest by peeling off outer leaves as the plants grow. Kale will grow well in containers as well as in the garden. Traditional Kale forms open curly leaves, the Heirloom (Tuscano) variety forms leaves that are longer and narrower with a dark green -bluish color.

Kale are produced in Flats only

Kale Traditional

Kale Heirloom

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is in the family of “cole’ crops which are cool weather crops. They prefer cooler weather to warmer weather but will not tolerate a frost. Although Kohlrabi looks like a root crop, it is actually a swelling stem that gives the plant it’s unique look. Both the leaves and the stems are edible. Kohlrabi grows best in rich, fertile soil, with a consistent water level. These plants perform well in containers as well as in the ground. Plants should be spaced about 4″ – 6″ apart to allow branches to reach out. The stem is ready to harvest when it reaches approximately 2” in diameter.

Kohlrabi are produced in Flats only

Leeks

Leeks are a slow growing vegetable that perform well in cooler temperatures. They have a mild onion flavor. Leeks will not grow well if water sits at the base of the plant, therefore it is recommended that soil or mulch is hilled around the base of the plant as it becomes more established. Leeks should be spaced 4″ apart leaving space between them for light and air to reach the bottom of the plant. Mature leeks are approximately 2′ tall and 1″ – 2″ wide at the base. A mature leek can be harvested by gently removing the entire plant out of the ground.

Leeks are produced in flats only

Lettuce

Lettuce falls into two basic categories: Head Lettuce, and Leaf Lettuce. The main difference in the garden is that leaf lettuce can be harvested as the leaves form and will continue to produce more leaves for several weeks as long as the heart of the plant is not damaged. A head lettuce produces a single head which is harvested when the head is formed. This type of lettuce will last in the refrigerator for a bit as the leaves are removed or sections are cut off. Stagger planting of head lettuce to provide continuous supply throughout the season. 

Lettuce can tolerate cooler temperatures but not as cold as “cold weather – cole” crops. Lettuce needs plenty of water but should provide drainage by the base of the plant. Mulch and sand will help with this. Lettuce grows well in fertile, sunny areas. It does not grow well in extreme heat. It grows well in containers as well as in the ground. Plants should be placed 8″ to 12″ apart.

All varieties of Lettuce are produced in Flats

12″ Bowls and Garden packs are variety blends of Leaf Lettuce

Head Lettuce

Boston

Buttercrunch

Escarole

Iceberg

Radicchio

Red Iceberg

Red Romaine

Romaine

Ruby Red

Leaf Lettuce

All Star

Black Seeded Simpson

Mesclun Blend

Oakleaf

Melons

Melons grow well in warm summer months and produce sweet fruit in late summer and fall. Melons do well in rich soil which has sand added to increase drainage. Young plants should be planted in a slightly mounded soil and mulched to help keep a well needed moisture level consistent while keeping water from sitting against the base of the plant.  Soil temperature needs to be over 65 degrees during the day as well as nights.  These plants are not tolerant of cool temperatures or heavy winds and should be protected from these conditions. Although melons need plenty of water, once fruit is set be sure not to over water as this could cause fruit to split.

Plants should be spaced at least 18″ to 24″ apart allowing 3′-4′ around them for branching out of vines. Fruit forms on the vines and will grow best and will be sweetest when sunlight reaches all parts of the plants.

Melons are produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium Pots

Cantaloupe

Watermelon

Okra

Okra is a warm weather crop. Soil temperature should be over 70 degrees during the day and night. These plants are not tolerant of cool temperatures. Plants should be spaced 10″ – 12″ apart, leaving room for the upright plant to form. Okra plants can grow tall, often over 4′ high, but don’t branch out tremendously. Okra thrives in rich, nutritious soil and can tolerate less water than some other vegetables, however, water should be kept at a consistent level.

Okra pods should be harvested when they are between 3″ and 5″ for best flavor. Once the plants have begun to produce pods, they should be checked every day as pods continue to grow and mature quickly during the warm months. 

Okra are produced in Flats only

Onions

Onions are a slow growing cool weather crop. Young plants should be placed 4″-6″ apart. Onions grow best in a heavy, rich soil. Plants grow with a shallow root system and form bulbs that are a staple in any kitchen. Onions require plenty of water however will not do well when sitting in water. Mulch is helpful in keeping the necessary water at a consistent level and will help the forming onion bulb to maintain it’s potential flavor. Onions are not “root” crops. They push away from the soil line as the bulbs form. Onions can be harvested at different sizes. They reach full maturity when leaves of the plant begin to turn yellow. Mature onions can be harvested by gently removing the entire plant out of the ground. Onions will hold longer than most other vegetables.

Onions are produced in Flats only

Onion Bunching (Scallions)

Onion Red

Onion White Sweet

Onion Yellow Sweet

Peas

Peas are an easy to grow, cool weather crop and will produce until the extreme heat of the summer months. Peas grow best in a well draining soil. Young plants can be spaced 6″ apart and will benefit from a trellis or cage for the plant to climb. Once pea pods form they should be checked every day for mature pods. They will taste best when harvested at maturity and not over ripe. 

Traditional peas will need to be “shelled” because the outer shell is inedible. Shell the pea by snapping off the ends of the pod and gently break it open. Remove the tender peas inside.

Snow Peas and Sugar Snap Peas do not have to be shelled as the entire pod is edible. 

Peas are produced in Flats only

Peas

Peas Snow

Peas Sugar Snap

Peppers

Peppers are a very popular warm weather crop. They grow in a variety of sizes, shapes, colors and tastes. Peppers grow well in containers, as well as in the ground. Space approximately 18″ – 20″ apart. Peppers grow best in a loose, fertile soil that has reached a temperature of at least 60 degrees. Young plants are not tolerant of cool temperatures or heavy winds. Prevent exposure to these conditions. Peppers need plenty of water as the plants become established but should be mulched. Mulch is beneficial as it is helpful in providing consistent water levels and keeping water from sitting against the plant which could damage the main stem of the plant. It is recommended that peppers be staked or trellised to help the plant support the weight of the growing fruit. Peppers will continue to produce throughout the summer months. 

Hot Peppers

The heat of Hot Peppers vary from mildly hot to extremely hot and are measured using the “Scoville Scale”. The higher the Scoville Scale value, the hotter the pepper. The peppers at the highest end of the spectrum are not meant to be eaten raw and could burn skin and eyes. Gloves should be worn when cooking with these peppers.

Hot Peppers are produced in Flats, 4.5″ Premium pots, and Garden Packs.

Hot Peppers in Alphabetical order along with Scoville Scale Rating (*) and container size:

Bhut Jolokia [Ghost Pepper]  (1,040,000) 4.5″ Pots only

Caribbean Red Hot (400,000)  Flats & 4.5″ Pots

Carolina Hot Reaper (2,200,000) 4.5″ Pots only

Cayenne Long Thin (45,000)    Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Habanero (350,000)              Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Hungarian Hot Wax (10,000)    Flats only              

Jalapeno (10,000)                Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Red Cherry Hot (500)          Flats only                                

Scotch Bonnet (100,000-350,000)  Gardens packs Only

Sriracha (2,500)                           4.5″ Pots only

Super Chili (50,000)                    Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Gardens

Tabasco (50,000)                          Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Trinidad Scorpion (1,000,000)     4.5″ Pots only

Sweet Peppers 

Sweet peppers are a versatile addition to any kitchen. They can be enjoyed raw or cooked. 

Sweet Peppers are produced in Flats, 4.5″ Premium pots, and Garden Packs.  Green Bell Peppers are also produced in 7.5″ Premium pots.

Sweet Peppers in Alphabetical order along with container size

California Wonder-Green Bell  Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs, 7.5″ Pots

Cubanelle                            Flats only                     

Italian Bullhorn               4.5″ Pots only                        

Orange Bell                        4.5″ Pots, Garden packs        

Rainbow Bell                      Flats only                               

Red Bell                            Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Shishito                              4.5″ Pots only                         

Sweet Banana                    Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Sweet Italian Frying      4.5″ Pots, Garden packs        

Yellow Bell (Golden)    Flats, 4.5″ Pots, Garden packs

Radish

Radishes are a fast growing cool weather root crop. They can be planted close together, approximately 2″ apart, in rich, loose soil that remains consistently moist. Radishes thrive in sunny, cool temperatures but do not do well in draught conditions which can stress the root and damage not only the root but also the flavor. As the root of the radish begins to push from the soil line, it is ready for harvest. The root should be approximately 1″ in diameter. If left in the ground too long, the radish will lose it’s sweet flavor. The plant can be harvested by loosening the surrounding soil and gently pulling the entire plant out. Radishes will not grow well in the hot summer months.

Spinach

Spinach is an early season cool weather crop. This nutritious vegetable can be planted in containers or in the ground as long as the soil is rich, and holds a consistent moisture level. Spinach should be planted about 10″- 12″ apart to allow room for the plant to continue to produce edible leaves. The leaves can continue to be harvested over a period of time if cut from the outside leaves, and the heart of the plant is not damaged. The entire plant can also be cut at it’s base if a single harvest is desired. Be sure to harvest leaves as they reach maturity, over grown leaves will begin to change color and lose flavor. Spinach does not grow well in the extreme heat of the summer.

Squash

Squash is planted in the warmer temperatures of the season. Young plants are sensitive to temperature variations and need to be protected from cool temperatures and high winds.  New transplants can also be sensitive to extreme sun but once roots are established, they will produce best with at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Plant squash in rich well draining soil. Mulch will help provide necessary consistent water levels throughout the growing season as well as protecting roots on cooler nights. 

Squash falls into two main categories: Summer Squash and Winter Squash. 

Summer Squash

Summer Squash should be planted at least 3′ apart to allow branching out of the main plant and to allow sun and air circulation to reach to the bottom of the plant.  Summer Squash grows more quickly than Winter Squash and continue to produce fruit throughout the warm summer months. The skin of Summer Squash is thin and tender and once harvested they do not hold or store for any significant amount of time. They can be harvested when they reach their full growth potential or slightly smaller.   

Summer Squash are produced in Flats and 4.5″ Premium pots.

Summer Squash in Alphabetical order along with container size.       

    Zucchini Sultan is a traditional looking green zucchini that is parthenocarpic which means it is self pollinating.

Yellow Zucchini

Green Zucchini

Yellow Straight Neck (4.5″ Pots only)

Zucchini Sultan (4.5″ Pots only)

Winter Squash

Winter Squash are slow growing and are harvested in late summer or early fall. They have a thick hard skin which provides protection while it is growing as well as after harvest for storage. These squash can last several months after harvest if stored correctly. Winter Squash needs to reach full maturity to offer its best flavor. Winter Squash needs plenty of room for a vining habit and should be planted about 6 feet apart to allow room for vines to run. 

All Winter Squash varieties are available in 4.5″ Premium pot size only.

        Acorn Squash, Butternut Squash, Cucuzzi Squash – Italian Edible Gourd, Pumpkin, Spaghetti Squash

Acorn

Butternut

Cucuzzi

Pumpkin

Spaghetti

Strawberries

Strawberries are a popular fruit that is relatively easy to grow. Young plants require a rich, well draining soil which can be accomplished by loosening the surrounding soil and adding sand and a light mulch. Strawberries require plenty of sun, water and food but will not do well in standing water. Fruit will be sweetest if sun is allowed to reach the entire plant. In order to minimize disease, strawberries should not be planted in the garden where tomatoes, eggplant, peppers or other strawberries were previously grown. Plants should be placed approximately 18″ apart to allow runners to form. New runners will form the base plant for the next year. Pruning at the end of the season will help plants to stay healthy and productive. Small white flowers form to produce the berry which is ready for harvest when it reaches a deep red color.

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard is a very nutritious, leafy crop that can handle cooler temperatures. Plants should be placed about 12″ apart leaving room around it for the plant to continue to produce edible leaves and allow sunlight and air to reach the entire plant. Swiss Chard should be planted in rich, soil that holds a consistent moisture level. Leaves can be harvested by cutting them from the outer portion of the plant inward or by cutting the entire plant close to the soil level. Plants should be harvested when they reach about 12″ in height for best flavor.  

Bright Lights Chards

Red Chard

White Chard (Green)

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are extremely versatile and popular in most gardens. They come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors. We use four main category sections to list our tomatoes: Cherry/Grape, Plum, Slicer and Heirloom Slicer.

All tomatoes need space to branch out and provide sufficient room for fruit to form. Sunlight needs to reach as much of the plant as possible in order for fruit to ripen to it’s fullest potential. Tomato plants require plenty of water to produce juicy, delicious fruit, however, sitting water will damage the root of the plant. Mulch will assist in maintaining consistent water levels. Drought conditions can cause the fruit to split. It is essential to feed tomatoes throughout their productive period.  

It is important to understand the difference between Determinate and Indeterminate tomatoes; their unique growing patterns, how they grow and produce fruit, as well as the size of the fruit. This will help you determine which varieties will produce the type of tomato you would like to grow. 

Determinate vs Indeterminate

Determinate: These plants tend to be shorter and bushy. Although all tomato plants can benefit by being staked or tied, it is not always necessary for determinate varieties. Staking will function more as support for the weight of forming fruit from pulling branches down or breaking them. Although determinate tomatoes do not grow as tall as indeterminate, they still require plenty of space around the base plant for the growth of bushy branches that need to grow to form fruit clusters. The clusters tend to grow and ripen within a short time. Determinate tomatoes grow well in containers as long as they have plenty of space around them. When planting in the ground, they should be spaced at least 30″ to 36″ apart. These plants will have a shorter production period than indeterminate varieties, however, the amount of produce can still be quite prolific.

Indeterminate: These plants grow tall and shoot vine like branches. Staking and tying is necessary to support the expansive growth of these plants. They can grow over 7′ tall and can benefit from pruning. These varieties are very popular because fruit forms continuously throughout the summer season and can continue until frost. At any time, fruit can be found in various states of development. If grown in containers, there must be sufficient support to reach the tall branches as well as supporting the outer branches which will bear the weight of the fruit. When planted in the garden, these plants should be spaced over 36″ apart.

Tomatoes are produced in Flats, 4.5″ Premium pots, 7.5″ Premium Pots and Gardens

Attached is a key to help narrow your search:

Tomato Label: Det = Determinate   Ind = Indeterminate   Semi-Det = Semi Determinate

Color Codes:

Container Compatible

Great for Container Growing:

These Determinate Varieties are perfect for container growing although, many other varieties will perform well in containers as well.

Tumbling Tom Cherry (in Cherry Category), Husky Red Slicer (in Slicing Category), Patio Slicer (in Slicing Category)

Tomatoes Listed by Category – alphabetically, Label, and container size along with the approximate fruit weight.

Tomatoes Cherry/Grape:

Black Cherry (4.5″ Pots only)

Cherry, Ind,  .5 oz – .8 oz

Golden Cherry/Grape (4.5″ Pots only)

Cherry, Ind,  .4 oz -.7 oz

Grape  (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Cherry, Ind,  .8 oz -1.2 oz

Red Cherry (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Cherry, Ind,  1 oz – 1.2 oz

Sweet 100 (Flats, 4.5″ Pots, 7.5″ Pots)

Cherry, Ind,  .8 oz – 1 oz

Sweet Million (Flats only)

Cherry, Ind,  .4 oz – .5 oz             

Tumbling Tom (4.5″ Pots only)

Cherry, Det,  1 oz    

Tomatoes Plum:

Roma (Flats only)

Plum, Det,  2-3 oz

San Marzano (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Plum, Ind,  5-8 oz

Viva Italian (Flats, 4.5″ Pots, 7.5″ Pots)

Plum, Det,  3-4 oz

Tomatoes Slicer:

Beefmaster (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  1 lb

Beefsteak (Flats, 4.5″ Pots, 7.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  1 lb

Better Boy (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  8 oz – 10 oz

Better Bush (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Det,  5 oz – 8 oz

Big Beef (Flats only)

Slicer, Ind,  10 oz – 12 oz

Burpee Big Boy (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  8 oz 

Celebrity (Flats and 4.5″ Pots) 

Slicer, Semi-Det,  8-11 oz

Early Girl (Flats, 4.5″ Pots, 7.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  4-6 oz

Husky Red (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Det,  6 oz – 8 oz

Indigo Rose (4.5″ Pots only)

Cocktail Slicer, Ind,  1.5 oz – 2 oz 

Jet Star (Flats only)

Slicer, Ind,  6-8 oz

Lemon Boy (Flats only)

Slicer, Ind,  8-11 oz

Non-Acid Yellow (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  8 oz

Park’s Whopper (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  12 oz – 14 oz

Patio (Flats only)

Slicer, Det,  4 oz – 5 oz

Rutgers Select (Flats only)

Slicer, Ind,  5 oz

Supersonic (Flats and 4.5″ Pots)

Slicer, Ind,  6-8 oz

Heirloom Slicer Tomatoes:

Heirloom tomatoes are available in 4.5″ Premium Pots only. 

Black Krim (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind,  8 oz – 12 oz

Brandywine Red (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Semi-Det,  14 oz – 18 oz

Cherokee Purple (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind, 10 oz – 12 oz

Giant Belgium (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind, 1 lb to 2 lb

Heirloom Orange (4.5 Pots only)

Slicer, Ind,  1 lb to 2 lb

Manalucie (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind, 8 oz – 10 oz

Marglobe (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind,  8 oz – 10 oz

Mortgage Lifter (4.5″ Pots only)

Slicer, Ind, 2.5 lb